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Log 41

15.00

Fall 2017

Log 41 both observes the state of architecture today and devotes 114 pages to a special section called Working Queer, guest-edited by architect Jaffer Kolb. From Hans Tursack’s commentary on “shape architecture” to Michael Young’s valuation of parafiction as a critique of realism; from Lisa Hsieh’s examination of modernology in Japan to Cynthia Davidson’s conversation with Martino Stierli, Log 41 considers both history and the contemporary. In Working Queer, nineteen authors take a similar look at history and the contemporary in articles ranging from homo-fascism in early 20th-century aesthetics to trans gender bathroom typologies for today, as well as methods of work, materials, and mediation that can all be considered queer, or queering, in our pluralist, mediated world.

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Contents

Chris Bennett & Alissa Anderson Big Sand, Small Town

Cynthia Davidson On the Record with Martino Stierli

Lisa Hsieh Architecture’s Disquieting Ghosts

Xuan Luo Aporia and Its Disclosure

Hans Tursack The Problem with Shape

Michael Young The Art of the Plausible and the Aesthetics of Doubt

PLUS: a special section: Working Queer

Ellie Abrons For Real

Andreas Angelidakis Demos, Polemos

Annie Barrett Noncon Form

Jaffer Kolb The End of Queer Space?

Caitlin Blanchfield & Farzin Lotfi-Jam The Bedroom of Things

Stratton Coffman Three Degrees of Squeeze

Mustafa Faruki Celebatorium

Nicholas Gamso Fascist Intrigue and the Homo-Spatial Imaginary

Andrew Holder Five Points Toward a Queer Architecture; Or, Notes on Mario Banana No. 1

Andrés Jaque Grindr Archiurbanism

Jaffer Kolb The End of Queer Space?

Ang Li Alchemical Acts

Michael Meredith 2,497 Words: Provincialism, Critical or Otherwise

Ivan L. Munuera An Organism of Hedonistic Pleasures: The Palladium

Joel Sanders From Stud to Stalled! Architecture in Transition

Rosalyne Shieh It’s fine.

Michael Wang Queering the System

And observations on Lumen and real-estate realism . . .